Watch Rick Friedman Explain His Portrait Workflow at the B&H Event Space

If you follow his blog, you already know that our friend Rick Friedman held a workshop at the B&H Event Space. He visited to talk about how he approaches his portrait work, particularly when you need to make a great image of a VIP in very little time. (VIPs are not known for standing still for more than a few minutes…)

At any rate, Rick's been doing this since the Reagan years, so he's probably got the hang of it by now. Have a look at the video, which has just been posted by B&H, and see if you can pick up a few pro tips! Or, if you prefer to read his blog post, you can do that, instead.

NAB 2015 News: Rosco Announces LitePad Vector

The folks at No Film School visited with Rosco's Joel Svendsen at NAB 2015. Rosco had just taken the wraps off their new LitePad Vector – a more powerful LitePad unit, available soon! – and also showed off the LED Tape product, which will arrive in the coming months. Have a look at No Film School's video for all the details:

We're at NAB 2015 in the Dedolight Booth

NAB Show Logo

As in many years previous, we're in sunny Las Vegas at the NAB Show helping make people aware of new gear from Dedolight. We'd love to meet you if you're in town! Come to booth C9835 and ask for Russ or Allen. And we're in good company, as there's lots of lovely gear also on display by our neighbors: Atomos, Red Rock Micro, Zacuto, and Zeiss. Looking forward to seeing you!

Learning about Dedolight at NAB 2015 Dedolight's booth at NAB 2015

Beautiful, Endlessly Patient Models — Available at Very Reasonable Rates

Yellow orchid flowers

Many photographers dream of the chance to photograph beautiful live models—hundreds of them—each willing to pose without complaint until the shooters are satisfied with their results. It helps if the models are flowers, and in this case orchids.

Every year, the New York Botanical Garden puts on the country’s largest curated orchid show. Even if it’s freezing outside and the Garden’s extensive acreage is covered with snow, the crystal palace Conservatory plays hosts to thousands of visitors, the vast majority of them taking pictures with every level of camera – inexpensive point-and-shoots, iPhones and iPads, and the whole gamut of "big boy" digital cameras. The variety of cameras on display doesn't quite exceed the variety of flowers…

And what flowers they are. A word to the wise: once you arrive at the Conservatory, set aside a few minutes for your camera to acclimatize to the high humidity. Here’s an example of what happens if you rush the process. (Who needs VSCO filters when you've got Mother Nature?)

Humidity caused this hazy effect

And sometimes, interesting images come not from the flowers on the stem, but the ones that have fallen into the reflecting ponds below. These are jade vine flowers — not technically an orchid, but a legume. They look positively otherworldly when they're on the vine!

Jade vine flowers in the reflecting pond

In two recent visits, I didn’t see a single film camera being used, and there’s no question that if we were still in the film era, there would be a much smaller number of photographers there. In fact, the number of linear feet of film produced by Kodak is down 96 percent from 2007, and GoPro has a market cap six times larger than Kodak.

LumiQuest's Pocket Bouncer added some fill light

Lavender orchid flowers

This year's show closes shortly (April 19th), and I urge you to see it.

If you can't make it, remember that the New York Botanical Garden is an extraordinary venue for photographers year-round.

While it may seem remote, set in the middle of the Bronx, it's actually very easy to reach by mass transit or by car. A comfortable 20 minute ride on Metro-North's Harlem line lets you leave the intensity of midtown Manhattan behind for a few hours. And who doesn't need that, once in a while?

The Unsung Heroes Behind the Great Photos

Great photos are made on all kinds of cameras — some the kind anyone can buy, some a little more boutique, and others still heavily modified by people with a gift for technical wizardry. National Geographic, always a great source of images, recently released a wonderful short film acknowledging the contributions of one of their longtime camera technicians. He's a humble, soft-spoken man named Kenji Yamaguchi. Please take just a few minutes of your day to appreciate the part he's played in some of the photographs you've seen in the Geographic over the last three decades.